Django Unchained (2012)

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Set in the south 2 years before the civil war, Django Unchained stars Jamie Foxx as Django, whose brutal history with his previous slaver lands him with bounty hunter Dr. King Schultz (Christoph Waltz). Schultz is on the murderous hunt for the Brittle brothers, and only Django can lead him straight to them. Honing vital hunting skills, Django remains focused on one goal: the finding and rescuing of Broomhilda (Kerry Washington), his wife whom he lost in the slave trade long before. Django and Schultz’s search ultimately leads to Calvin Candie (Leonardo DiCaprio), the proprietor of the infamous plantation called “Candyland.” Throughout the events that unfold, both Django and Schultz arouse the suspicion of Stephen (Samuel L. Jackson), Candie’s trusted house slave.

This incredible film is directed by the wonderful film visionary Quentin Tarantino. THE Quentin Tarantino. There is no other like him. Django Unchained contains great cinematography, a clever plot with great dialogue, and so many brilliant actors. Jamie Foxx, Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio, Kerry Washington, and Samuel L. Jackson all did their own thing, but they did it well. They all had unique characters and they shined portraying their different roles (I personally believe that Christoph Waltz, Leonardo DiCaprio, and Samuel L. Jackson took the show though).

There’s a sensible reason why nobody ever wanted to be an Indian whenever we played Cowboys and Indians as kids. That’s because the white man was invariably the hero of the Westerns on which we’d been weaned, while the red man had always been presented as a wild savage dismissed by the dehumanizing affirmation that, “The only good Injun is a dead Injun.”

Hollywood has also promoted a set of stereotypes when it comes to the depictions of black-white race relations during slavery, with classics like The Birth of the Nation (1915) and Gone with the Wind (1939) setting the tone. Consequently, most movies have by-and-large suggested that it was a benign institution under which docile African-Americans were well-treated by kindly masters, at least as long as they remained submissive and knew their place. – by film critic Kam Williams

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Leave it to Quentin Tarantino to put a fresh spin on the genre, just as he did in the World War II flick Inglourious Basterds (2009). This is the first film I’ve seen that truly tried to portray a revenge story for the slaves, in their POV, and did it INCREDIBLY well. Finally, the audience is encouraged to take a deeper look at the excruciating suffering and bullshit the slaves had to go through, and Django welcomed us to sympathize with them and root for them throughout the entire film. Ofcourse, we can’t forget the bonus gory scenes, where Tarantino just ultimately wanted to add shock value to his film, as always.

The soundtrack made the movie though. It added the final touch. Rap music in a western film? It just really felt like this movie was for the black people, and rap music is a huge part of their culture, so why not embrace it and add their music to the scenes where Jamie Foxx is kicking ass, right?

 
 
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